shadow
shadow

Brandywine Battlefield

1491 Baltimore Pike, Chadds Ford, PA 19317

 

Washington sought to defend Philadelphia from the British, who had landed on the Elk River in Maryland, by assembling a strong defense near Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. This is known as the Battle of the Brandywine. Washington was not able to withstand the British force and had to retreat. His young French ally and officer, the Marquis de Layfatte, was wounded in the battle. Nevertheless, Washington’s commitment to liberty held the beleaguered nation together. What galvanized Washington’s leadership in such adversity was his unstinting belief in the providence of God. On more than 200 occasions in his writings, both public and private, in times of success as well as in defeat, Washington relied on the truth that God was at work in the affairs of human history.  (See Romans 8:28.)

Washington wrote to Brigadier General Thomas Nelson on August 20, 1778: “The hand of Providence has been so conspicuous in all this, that he must be worse than an infidel that lacks faith, and more than wicked, that has not gratitude enough to acknowledge his obligations, but, it will be time enough for me to turn preacher, when my present appointment ceases; and therefore, I shall add no more on the Doctrine of Providence.”  When Washington uses the phrase, “that he must be worse than an infidel” he is quoting 1 Timothy 5:8 (KJV).